Behind the Goals with Oliver Haltaway of the Big Bath City Bid

On this week’s Behind the Goals, Oliver Holtaway shared the Bath City story with us – they have been in community ownership for a year, following a two-year campaign known as “The Big Bath City Bid”.

Listen to find out about the ups and downs of the bid – and how they enlisted the help of a famous fan to make it a success!

Listen to the interview here:

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Club Development Scotland visits Football Memories Scotland

Since starting out in 2009 Football Memories, which is based at Hampden Stadium, has achieved remarkable results with people with dementia across Scotland.

Now the Scotland-wide Football Memories Volunteer Network has won the Volunteer Team of the Year category at this year’s Museums + Heritage Awards organised by M+H Media

If you’re supportive of our work and the content we’re producing, please do consider supporting through a small monthly financial donation via our Patreon channel. We aim to keep all our resources, guidance and documents free of charge to ensure we can help support as many clubs and fans as possible. 

 

Behind the Goals with David Nicol of SMISA

We caught up with St. Mirren Independent Supporters Association & Championship winners St Mirren Director David Nicol to talk all things fan ownership, fan director, supporter liaison officers and community benefit at the Paisley club.

If you’re supportive of our work and the content we’re producing, please do consider supporting through a small monthly financial donation via our Patreon channel. We aim to keep all our resources, guidance and documents free of charge to ensure we can help support as many clubs and fans as possible. 

Behind the Goals with Jacqui Low of Partick Thistle

As part of our series of Club Development Scotland videos, we paid a visit to Partick Thistle to find out more about their recent women and girls fan engagement work, including the first ever survey of its female fans. Thistle will use the findings to create a strategy to retain and attract more girls and women to matches.

If you’re supportive of our work and the content we’re producing, please do consider supporting through a small monthly financial donation via our Patreon channel. We aim to keep all our resources, guidance and documents free of charge to ensure we can help support as many clubs and fans as possible. 

 

The Masterclass Series: Volunteering with Erin Fulton

The third in our Masterclass series, this week on Behind the Goals we speak to Erin Fulton, Volunteer & Interns Manager at PAS about volunteering for community sport clubs.

If you’re supportive of our work and the content we’re producing, please do consider supporting through a small monthly financial donation via our Patreon channel. We aim to keep all our resources, guidance and documents free of charge to ensure we can help support as many clubs and fans as possible. 

Behind the Goals with Austin MacPhee of AMS

We made the trip to AMS, a charitable organisation which uses football as a means to support education, employability and sports development in Fife. An SFA Legacy Mark club, it was set up by Austin MacPhee, who is also assistant manager for Hearts and Northern Ireland.

A fascinating character, Austin filled us in about his career as a player and about the experiences which inspired him to set up AMS, and his perspectives on the game.

Supporters Direct Scotland are proud to support AMS through their Club Development Scotland unit, where they offer ongoing support in the areas of development, governance and finance. Want to find out how we can help support your club? Get in touch.

The Well Society: Fan Ownership One Year On

As part of a new series of videos for our consultancy arm Club Development Scotland – we visited members The Well Society to hear more about their ownership of Motherwell FC one year on.

Motherwell FC were the first club in the top flight of Scottish football to be owned by their supporters when The Well Society took on ownership of the club in 2016. Here we explore the impact their ownership has made to the club.

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel here. 

About Club Development Scotland

Club Development Scotland is a one-stop resource for clubs of any size and scale to help them best govern and develop their activities.

Alongside our guidelines, we offer a range of services to sport clubs of all shapes and sizes (and across a number of sports) to help them achieve their aims and objectives.

Club Development Scotland is an extension of the work that has been delivered throughout England and Wales by Supporters Direct (Club Development) and was also partly been formed from a recommendation from the ‘Supporter Involvement in Football Governance’ Report which came from a Working Group involving Supporters Direct, the Scottish FA, the SPFL, SportScotland and the Scottish Government.

We develop these resources and guidance documents free of charge for clubs and hope patrons can help us continue develop them as to best support community clubs across Scotland. Please consider doing so here.

 

Club Development Scotland Visit Pollok FC

As part of our work to promote and support clubs across Scotland, we’ve launched a new series of videos taking a look at some of the extensive and great work happening at all levels of Scottish football.

Our ‘Club Development Scotland’ series will focus upon how clubs are delivering a wider impact within their local communities and kicks off with a visit to Pollok FC.

Pollok United were recently visited by UEFA President Mr Čeferin. Pollok United possess a thriving girls section, and Mr Čeferin’s visit not only highlighted UEFA’s new #EqualGame campaign promoting diversity, inclusion and accessibility to football for all, but also the European body’s Together #WePlay Strong initiative aimed at encouraging more girls to play football.

Remember you can keep up with all our work relating to Club Development Scotland by:

The 2018 Club Development Scotland Survey

Club Development Scotland are proud to launch their first annual and national Club Development Survey, looking at the aspirations of sport clubs across Scotland.

The survey, sponsored by the Soccer Store, will ask clubs about their current situation and their aspirations for the future, including whether they have interests in growing their club and its facilities.

Results will help inform Club Development Scotland about the type of guidance and support it offers to clubs in the future. Findings from the survey will be shared via the Club Development Scotland quarterly newsletter, which you can sign up to here.

Clubs that enter the survey can enter a draw to win a £100 gift voucher to our sponsors ‘The Soccer Store‘.

Measuring Social Value Guidance

Measuring the social impact of your sports club is important for a number of reasons, such as:

• It can help you understand where the club can improve in its performance to maximise community benefit

• It can help to articulate the value of the club to important stakeholders like funders and local community groups, leading to a range of benefits such as better partnerships, increased investment and more volunteers

• It can help retain focus on a range of objectives rather than simply judging the club on the success of the senior men’s team (for example)

This is a short guide designed to give you some pointers on easy ways that every club can evaluate the value it is providing to the local community by measuring the social, economic and environmental contributions that they make. The areas identified and the different indicators could be adapted to suit your own club, and serve as an example for how you might measure social value.

This is a hitherto poorly researched area and, with clear data available that can exemplify the positives that clubs do provide, it can bring about a new way for clubs to engage with their communities by explaining the wider social benefits that can be offered.

Not sure where to start? Get in touch, we can provide a complete report for you.

Volunteering Guidance

Volunteering is a common term in the community club network, but what does it actually mean and who are volunteers?

Volunteering means individuals giving their time of their own free will and without coercion for no financial reward.

Community clubs will have a number of different volunteer roles; including board or committee members, fundraisers, coaches. Plus, there is often an
army of people who provide refreshments, undertake maintenance and promote the club more widely.

When talking about volunteering it is vital to consider it from both the perspective of the individual volunteering and the organisation receiving their support.

For developing organisations a volunteer network provides access to individuals that have skills, expertise and a passion for supporting their local community. As this resource shows there are obvious financial benefits from having a well developed team of volunteers.

The volunteer gets the opportunity to learn or develop new skills, make and establish friendships with others that share the same community values and contribute to the creation of a more sustainable community sports club. Volunteering can also provide excellent opportunities for work experience.

Funding Guidance

Sport clubs can look to raise significant capital for funding through their own independent fundraising methods but often there are funders who support community projects and may make suitable funding partners for your project.

Obtaining sufficient funding is often the main requirement and consideration when a Supporters Trust is looking to embark on a project no matter how big or small.

Your club can obtain funding for a variety of projects and there are two distinct types which funders acknowledge: Capital projects usually relate to property and buildings where a project exceeds £50,000. For example, funding facilities such as a 3G pitch being built. They are longer term projects investing in something that depreciates over time. Revenue projects are usually projects where total expenditure is less than £50,000. The costs will normally be to meet community or sporting objectives such as coaching or sports equipment.

Funding is often only available for specific projects in individual regions. Usually, these projects are working with and benefiting certain groups in your community. The funders are only able to fund a limited amount of grants per year and the application process is extremely competitive. Some examples of funders who offer grants for single projects are:

This guidance offers some advice and inspiration in the form of case studies to help guide trusts through potential funding applications.